Town Churches
The Live ForEvers


These notes are from the History of Sutton, written in 1878

There once existed in this vicinity a sect known as the "Live for Evers." They were peculiar in their views, believing that, like Adam, every man had a wife made from one of his own ribs, and that there was a danger of trouble if he did not get the right rib. Some of the women belonging to this order thought they were misplaced. Mrs. Fletcher was one of them, and also her sister, who married a Miner. The latter, it is said, left her husband, who went after her and had hard work to get her back.

They carried the idea of being misplaced so far as to misplace themselves in their own beds, putting the pillow for the man at one end of the bed, and that for the woman at the other. Like some of the Spiritualists of the present day, they were dissatisfied with their companions and sought for their affinities. It seems they held evening meetings to discuss and adjust their difficulties.

Mr. Fletcher came home one rainy night and found them holidng a meeting at his house; and not being in favor of their views, ordered them out, but on account of the rain they refused to go. So being enraged, he said, "If you fear rain more than fire you can stay," at the same time seizing the peel, he drove it into the fire and began scattering hot embers and fire coals around the room and among the crowd until they dispered, then he put out the fire and went to bed. A few days after he went to Grafton with his steers and tip-cart, but never returned, as he was found dead in the road, and it was supposed that he was murdered by the "Live for Evers." They thought if one seemed to be dead, faith accompanied by certain manipulations by the faithful would restore him to life. That part of their fatih gave them their name. No record is found of the death of Fletcher. The only proximate date is the marriage of his widow, Mrs. Lucy Fletcher, with John Goodale, Dec 12, 1781.

Sutton Massachusetts Churches

SuttonMass